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question because they went to work on the trade to make donation. they were smaller than the union to start with, roughly 10 million people compared to the indians 22. is already tough road. but a military fact isn't as much paid attention to this it should be as 4 million of those 10 million people were black and enslave. when it came time to mobilize for war, they didn't have access to 10 million people. they have access to avoid population of 16 million, half of women, many underage peers to the demographics are tough to start with. >> host: how many white males at that point in the confederate south? obviously that was the base. >> guest: i try to figure out how many member voting age. the link between voting a soldier and was typed in an 18th century. i figure there's one point at you voting age white men. military age starts out smaller than not. 18 to 35. by the end of the war, 1555. >> host: what advantages going into the civil war, besides caught. we hear about cotton. we've heard about that for years has one of the advantages. were the advantages for the south? .. themselves to ot
of the use of naval forces by the union and confederate armies during the civil war. now on booktv. he reports on the impact that each navy made during the war, from union naval support of numerous battles, including vicksburg and new orleans to the confederates use of naval mines and the militaristic deployment of a submarine. it's a little under an hour. >> good evening, everyone. last time we met here on this very stage to talk about the civil war, jim, you are looking to finishing touches on your new book. you are preparing your publication as well. now i have to do this the way they do it on the talk shows. now, james mcpherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the re
commission. mary frances berry. c-span2. start with compared to the union 22. that was a tough road to hoe but if it is not as much paid attention to because 4 million wear black or slave so when it came time to mobilize the not have access to 10 million but a white population of 6 million, half for women and half for under age. the demographics were tough to start. >>host: how many white males? >>guest: i tried to figure out how many of of voting age. that link was pretty tight and with the voting age white men with 18 through 35 by the end it is 18 to 55. >>host: what advantages besides cotton, we hear about that for years what are the advantages? >> as lee said they were overwhelmed by the industrial north of slave labor south than two-thirds of the capital is with enslaved human beings. they had to ship out across the embargo. and then they could list the things that they don't have. with a lot of faith just says they made the united states when it was they could secede to make this other country in independent to build a nation states on the basis of cotton and slaves. they tal
where made during the war, from union naval support of numerous battles, including vicksburg and new orleans to the confederate use of naval mines and the deployment of a submarine. it's a little under an hour. [applause] >> good evening, everyone. last time we met here on this very stage, to talk about the story of the civil war at sea and on the rivers, jim, you were putting the finishing touches on your new book. craig, you were preparing four book for publication as well, and now both dish have to do this the way they do on the talk shows -- so, now, james mcpherson's war on the waters, the union and confederate navies, 1861 to 1865, and craig's civil war at sea, both very handsomely done, and it's good because we get to resume our conversation. we barely broke the surface. let's get right to it. because we spoke for an hour last time and we got to about january of 1862. so i'll assume you all know about 1861. and get to something that jim pointed out in his book, which i found rather interesting, and that is that 150 years ago this month, eye side from all the other things going
of the logic of this was in the states that have already succeeded from the union, but the prospect of the country as a whole falling apart of the federal government didn't assert its power and its authority, the west coast there were some secessionist sentiments and in the midwest we can talk about new york becoming a free port of entry like britain and germany. so we look back knowing the result of all of this which of course led to the emergence of the nation states with much greater powers reached is a precarious it was for a long period of time but it's also important to recognize the slave rights in terms of the civil war it was a broad state right settlement but the only state that seceded from the union were slave states and i don't think that is significant, too. there is no way of understanding secession and state rights outside of the question. >> prisoner steve, the nitze fusion proclamation committed to put an end to all the discussion and any existing remnants of slavery? >> it didn't. it was a very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration
of this was not just the states that had already seceded from the union, by the prospect of the country as a whole falling apart if the federal government didn't assert its power and its authority. the west coast, there was some secessionist sentiment. in the midwest, there was talk about new york being a free port of entry like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is about state rights and slavery in terms of the civil war. there was a broad state right sentiment, but the only states that seceded from the union was slave states, and i don't think that's insignificant too. there's no way of understanding secession and state rights outside the slavery question. >> host: professor hahn, 1863, the emancipation proke clay mages, -- proclamation, did it put an end to any discussion and any existin
. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of the history of the relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the first sent the troops into the soviet union as part of a broad counterrevolutionary force led by the british and then the united states refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer se
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. i think that's important a factor in that if you look at the broad history of the united states relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the united states first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states to refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise mat
union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, w
-father union, and that we may have moved away from that in society, and in many ways we have moved away from that in our understanding and the law and so on of what marriage -- what a relationship needs to do to qualify for marriage. we moved away from consummation for a marriage to be tested somewhat, we moved from that. i'm not a psychologist, but a philosopher. i animal -- analyze the arguments and show where the arguments go wrong. >> host: that's fair. i didn't mean to put you on the spot. >> guest: sure. what do you think the people on my side are missing? why do you think -- because you, -- >> host: it's not hard for me to understand why a gay man and people who are thinking about this as a question of how are we going to treat the gay friends, neighbors, fellow citizens, family members, would be for gay marriage; right? i think it's become a symbol for many people, even many people who probably are not even going to enter gay marriages. it's become a symbol of the idea of respect for gay people and their relationship. >> guest: right. i want to interrupt you there because sometimes w
and believed that strong unions are the foundation of a strong middle class. when union membership was at its peak in this country, we all grew together. the middle class grew and prospered. everyone from the richest c.e.o. to the minimum wage worker benefited from our nation's prosperity when labor union organization was at its peak. michigan's economy has always been a shining examples of that shared prosperity. when an auto worker who put in a hard day's work could earn enough not only to buy one of the cars he made but to buy a house, send his kids to college, take a nice vacation, have a good retirement, live the american dream. as unions have declined in this country, the middle class is also declined. those at the top earn more and more, while ordinary working people are seeing the american dream slip out of touch. and it's not just union workers who are losing ground. because unions don't just benefit their members. they benefit each and every american worker, regardless of whether you've ever held a union card. it is unions that fought for all of the things that we sort of take for g
to go into world war ii, when to speak with the union, and he said, look, we have realizes that if you're a does not sustain free enterprise, the united states cannot gain free enterprise itself. so if you're looking for a motive for this, that is really what it comes back to. >> is there something distinctive about the american state the positions it to do this? of the states occurred in the wind. >> you really have to understand this historically because if you ask the question of globalization being inevitable and you looked at the first half of 20th-century, it looked like it was impossible. you have empires that are fragmenting globalization. have two world wars. yet the oppression. in the question by the second world war is, is globalization at all possible? can you have a global capitol system? and it was only made possible because the american state had a specific capacity to take that on some specific capacities and the interest because you have to remember that after the first world war the u.s. was already a dominant economic power in the world by far. industrial power. alre
. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what the soviet union lost? >> soviet union lost more. anymore concentrated way because stalin -- german policy and eastern front, the other area. >> japan lost -- >> most of these 50 million casualties were civilians in china. so that's the accepted number. >> maochun yu, professor, what do you teach your at the naval academy speak with i teach mostly military history, world war ii, and modern china, east asi
that the year began with the american republic in grave danger. the union army was struggling to regrow virtually overnight from a few thousand men scattered across the continent, to more than half a billion. the inexperienced officers, the command of these were all volunteers was stymied by the sheer size of the breakaway confederate states of america. which covered a state larger than the entire european territory, conquered by napoleon. linke's closest advisor was secretary of state william henry seward. seward says that even smart people fail to see the difficulty of the union's task. they didn't apprehend the vast extent of the rebellion as he put it. military operations to be successful must be on a scale practically unknown in the art of four. yet the war department was an corrupt shambles, its chief on the verge of being fired. the confederacy also fielded a powerful economic weapon, near total control of the global continents apply. this was a time when textiles were driving the industrial revolution and cotton was perhaps the world's most important single commodity. the south
, collapse of the soviet union, the chief lifeline for so many. you see the expansion of the democracy itself. and so from the period of 1974 to about 2005 was a moment of tremendous democratic growth. but then i say 2005 because since 2005, we've seen a decline in political pluralism around the world. six consecutive years that has but i wanted to do this book was examined by that wise. unless you find is that these regimes understand that in a more globally interconnected world that the past forms of coercion can no longer be the blood tools that were so familiar from the 20th century. but think of mouse resolution or campaign, stalin's gulag, killing fields. now it's actually a much more subtle form of repression that are used by these regimes and they are refashioning dictatorship for a modern age. so that's the main thrust. and every country traveled to come i always meet with two groups of people. i meet with people serving the regime come is serving a dictator, political advisors i.d. labs, karami's and also his meeting with people trying to offend appeared at his meeting with the stu
organizations, organized people into unions in a way that we never had before or since. that was the greatest wave of unionization the united states ever seen. in the depths of the depression. think about the difference between then and now. in the depths of the depression millions of americans decided they wanted to join a union and they did so on a scale we had never had before or since. the second big organization was the socialist party's and the third was the american communist party who were coordinated with the cio and the joint membership and so on. very powerful organizations parallel to what you have in europe but after the war everything changed. if i could take a moment to explain why. roosevelt comes to power, the depression is underway three years, he runs on a balanced budget proposal, he gets into office and everyone tells him the economic crisis is worse than anything they have ever seen which is clearly true. they don't know what to do and it is getting worse. something has to be done. this might have been an interesting conversation but there are also people marching in the
union over the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. they talk about the u.s. health care system and later the house transportation committee hearing on high speed rail. on tomorrow's woo journal, u.s. news and world report business correspondent rick newman on the november jobs report. and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy and infect use disease directer and cbc directer thomas. washington journal begins live each morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >>> chief of staff had to make the plan for the innovation of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that the land would cost 700 men with 250,000 -- be at the bko and 500,000 to be named. >>> as harry truman's grandson somebody in the middle. i have to -- i choose to honor both. both the sacrifice and sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and i have a little girl like? who died as a result of the atomic bombing. it's unimaginable what that must have been like to be close to that to the hype center where that fire ball originated in the bla
it is -- i'm sure that millions of iranians are rushing to the west side of the european union to read the guidelines of human rights which clearly are having a great impact or thin life. one of the problems we're confronting -- it is a real problem. ali alluded to it. we are confronted with a huge dilemma. the dilemma is the following. want to stop iran from having nuclear weapons and the reason why that if you pursue a policy of support for democracy in iran at the same time, the regime will move away from negotiations and if we have to choose between depriving the regime of nuclear weapons or depriving the regime of its power inside the country, it's easier to achieve the former rather than the latter and it's better overall, that we can live with a authoritarian iran without nuclear reps and try to pursue a free iran, we might end up with a nuclear armed awer to tearan iran. so it's a dilemma but doesn't serve our purposes well. we haven't invested significantly on creating human rights tools. there's a lot of things we can do to increase our policy. and by the way, there's somethi
's lurch to the left and its inability to view the soviet union objectively and to concede that it was a clear and present danger. the case demonstrated the intimate connection between communism and liberalism, quote, when i took out my little fling and aimed at communism, chambers wrote in "witness," i also did something else. what i hit was the forces of that great socialist revolution which in the name of liberalism is been inching its ice cap. the one x liberal who saw the connection clearly was president ronald reagan. who awarded the medal of freedom. asked why, mr. reagan replied, 100 years ago people will ever forgotten the details but i want them to remember that out his went to jail as a traitor and whitaker chambers was honored by his fellow citizens. his conviction verify anti communism as a potent element of american politics. it gave bill buckley and other and other conservative they caused by which to unite traditional conservatives and libertarians against the common enemy, liberalism. historian george nash and others argued persuasively that without any com
and half after he made the announcement of the "state of the union" speech of the goal to get to the moon meeting with a reluctant leader of nasa, a james webb. listen closely see if you can get a sense how a real president pushes his government. >> host: is it really that hard even for a strong president to move the mountain called the government? >> apparently left left it is wonderful to get the point* across. there is no way this would be a great scientific experiment. the science of pfizer's for interested in the dimensions. he had a clear goal. >> he is leaving no doubt. with the two advisor stock back to hem and that is not easy to do. >> host: he liked that. >> i give him credit to hire people to talk back. it is good conversations. the book also gives a transcript of a conversation one year later. the smart people have reversed their position. is it too dangerous? the advisers said we will spin off amazing technology. we will define the sixties it is another great conversation. >> host: i love the change of mr. webb one year later the president asks this is a top priority? >> abs
of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: the ask the senate proceed to a voice vote on the adochghts resolution. -- on the adoption of the resolution. the presiding officer: is there further debate? if not, all in favor say aye. those opposed say no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the resolution is adopted. mr. reid: thanks, mr. president. i ask further that the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table, that there be no intervening action or debate and that any statements related to this matter appear in the record at the appropriate place as if given. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to h.r. 1845. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: h.r. 1845, an act to provide a demonstration project providing medicare coverage and so forth. the presiding officer: is there any objection to procee
, soviet documents, documents of the former soviet union have become available to researchers. the soviets played a pivotal war in the 1967 war. they precipitated the crisis. i was able to go to moscow and access some of these documents. there's been a new opening in two of the three major arab participants in the war. in jordan and in egypt, there's a tremendous wave of publications about the war, phepl oeurs, studies, even the release of certain documents which is rare in the arab world about 1967. the only place this has not occurred is in syria. in syria, officially the war never occurred. there is not one single official book -- and all books in syria are official -- about the 1967 war. how the average syria believes israel came into possession of the golan heights is a mystery to me. >> you were born where? >> i was born in the tiny town in upstate new york but raised in new jersey. >> when did you first go to israel? >> i first went when i was 15. i went to work on a farm. i worked in alfalfa, i worked in the cows, i became a cowboy. i was a lousy farmer. i went and studied history.
of communism substantiated then by the evil empire of the soviet union and the west, in his purgatory letter to his children, which had been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he saw the concentrated evil of our time. now, he looked with kindred eyes upon the enormity of communism. indeed, conservatives of all stripes could agree about that hideous this of the communist system, which is why the world of the cold war was, in many ways, a tidier, more manichean world than the one that we inhabit. whatever else might be said about it, the soviet union provided a sort of negative rallying point, something that conservatives of all sorts could define themselves against, and i wonder about today, what about today, how do conservatives to find themselves. well, that is a question that i hope the panel is going to conjure with. before i turn things over to them, i want to make just briefly to final points. one of which is -- has been raised a couple of times. if conservatives were virtually at one in regarding the freedom biking etiology of parmesan with repugnance, they were not, i
, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. proposed each country allow the other country's reconnaissance plane to fly overhead to detect preparations for a sneak attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed to like the
time included members of labor unions, farm groups and civil rights organizations. included representative not just of the medical profession but of the people who need it and use health care. a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. she was a member of the women's auxiliary of the steelworkers organizing committee, spending her days working in communities around the steel mills. greenberg told the audience at the national health conference that she had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just steps away from the comfortable headquarters of the american medical association, tenements, a 6 chicago where people struggled with terrible health conditions related to poverty and unemployment and struggled to obtain basic medical care. greenberg told the conference of the grossly overcrowded county hospital, the city's only public hospital with local describes as a death house, a single overcrowded private hospital served the entire african-american community of the south side. chicago's outpatient clinics
of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the victories, so he decides to send general winfield scott to invade mexico. he bombards the veracruz and travels through central mexico securing a capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans it was sort of a foreign conclusion that their side when and win easily because most are byrd a host of racist beliefs about mexican men foremost among them being that mexican and one lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact mexican troops fought very hard, as you can see , very few images, so it's rare when you find one. you can get a sense. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the war because they have vastly inferior weapons. their leader was terrible. mexico's government was in turmoil. there were broke. there were various panels were there was no money even making it to the army to support itself . because hostile net of american tribes in the north of mexico has so ravaged on the mexican that there was very little will to resist. now, on the mexican side most
made the announcement in the state of the union speech of the goal to get to the moon by the end of the decade. he is meeting with a reluctant leader of nasa, james webb. listen closely and see if you can get a sense of how a real president pushes his government. >> ellen fitzpatrick, is it really that hard for even a strong president to move this mountain called the government? >> apparently so. i think it is wonderful to see him really getting his point across here. there was no way this was going to be one of the great scientific experiments. and obviously, advisers were interested in all of the different intellectual dimensions of it. he had a very clear goal. >> he is leaving, there is no doubt about that. i give him credit for hiring people brave enough to talk to him. the book also gives the transcript of a conversation a year later. the smart people have almost reversed positions. he is saying it is too dangerous, should we think more about it. should we think more about the science about it. they are saying that we should spin off more great technology. it's another grea
that, you know, easy for the other guys to do. i understand that. but the problem in the european union is that there is only one dimension of union, and that is monetary union as opposed to fiscal union. and i think what's happened in greece, in spain, is that they benefited from low interest rates because of their reunion, and that meant that they allowed their fiscal policies to get out of line. so it's sort of just the reverse of the problem that we had here that we have here, which was okay, we can raise rates and cut them back. here, rates came down. so the discipline that would naturally occur disappeared when you have a union. >> i thought you at a different point. greece and spain and so forth, could borrow at german interest rates and they went kind of wild. the good old united states of america, we rent historically big deficits. we consumed without settling them. how is this all possible? because the chinese were happily loaning us money at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
which until this election was a predominantly republican-voting phenomena, and those in union city, new jersey, um, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. and a lot of that dose to who en-- goes to who engaged them when they showed up and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time in those communities. so i think there's a lot to be said for viewing the influence of latinos in this cycle and particularly going forward as part of a broader coalition. um, and one that, you know, i've heard time and time again everybody likes, republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national exit polls this year shouldn't give you a lot of comfort. >> right. >> it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion rights, 60% support for the affordable care act. um, the almost 59% support for same-sex marriage. those are, this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound particularly socially conservative to me. >> no. >> so -- >> and, and also the question i think at some
in the union. i daresay virtually every congressional district. like single employer plans, the last -- investments shrank but missed the not. so the contributions necessarily rose at a time when the businesses had less work and less ability to pay them. six years ago a bipartisan coalition in congress with the support of the business and labour community passed the pension protection act. that was an important piece of legislation that recognize that not all multi employer plans or like. some plans are healthier and others. the different plants have different needs. they need flexibility. similar coalition recognizing that multi employer plans as well as in the sun will need a greater from -- funding flexibility. where are we today? after all the events of the past decade, the financial health of these plans varies widely. as you can see from that status kraft, there is a wide range of financial conditions. two years ago, about one-third of all the participants were in plans that reported of a third of 10 million people were in plans that reported they were in green status. today ab
union as the associate or, chief legislative counsel at the washington office. brendan sasso with the hill, next area discussion, please. >> host: i want to ask briefly of competing civil investigations. this is something agent trained to touch briefly on. i'm wondering if the federal trade commission or the securities and exchange commission want to get information from an e-mail provider. they're investigating google i want to know whether the company is engaged in unethical business is. does this legislation impede that investigation? >> guest: let me explain why there might be better examples. google acts as a provider of communications service and is a provider of communications service. so i think what the world ought to look like as that the ftc, for example is investigating google and wants to get google's corporate records, it should be able to serve a subpoena on google and get those records. that is what the legislation is intended to do. if the ftc is doing an investigation of somebody else who has a gmail account into your e-mail is not a google corporate records
but the problem with the european union fed is monetary union's as opposed to the fiscal union. they benefited from the low interest-rate and that meant they allow the policies to get out of line. just the reverse of the problem that we have here. we could raise rates but the discipline that would occur. >> i thought you would make a different point*. . . there in the midst of deciding if they want more or if they want less. the euro could not survive some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis than they have head which means some kind of limit on fiscal policy for one thing but it goes beyond fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they managed to get in big trouble pouring a lot of money into building houses and that had some kind of oversight of economic policy more generally as part of the price of being in a union. and they wanted to make the union -- without the economic union. it doesn't work. so, the proposals are out there and i think they basically want to move toward more economic union and the cost to do that takes a change in a lot of deb
republic in grave danger. the union armies were struggling to grow virtually overnight from a few thousand men scattered across the continent to more than half a million. the inexperienced officers rushed into command of the ross volunteers were stymied by the sheer size of the breakaway confederate states of america which covered a space larger than the entire european territory conquered by napoleon. lincoln's closest adviser was secretary of state william henry seward. seward said that even they fail to see the difficulty of the union's task cannot apprehending the vast extent of the rebellion as he put it. military operations to be successful must be on a scale hitherto practically unknown in the art of war. >> the second year of the civil war, the strange federal government and we can in forces. 1862 and abraham lincoln's rise to greatness at 830 eastern, part of four days of book tv this weekend and read through christmas day on c-span2. >> with just days left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-in list of notable books. book tv will feature several of these li
of the union, 1860-61. more specifically will talk about however him again rejected any meaningful compromise. the country was gripped by a section of crisis because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. it was a north party and proudly so. it did not have a significant seven connection. lincoln was elected without a single lessor although for many of the 15 / states and only four of the border states did he get any popular votes and then nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history there will be taking over the executive branch of the national government. the republican party was proudly in northern party, during its brief existence in the mid 1850's damage its rhetoric and assault of the south, and the south major social institution racial slavery. and their determination that is the republicans' determination to well the north into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support, the republicans repeatedly condemned the south as on progressive, undemocratic, even unamerican. this party on the threshold of the presidency. those peop
in january 11, in a in a state of the union address, roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially the piece the allies plan to establish after fascism. he said the one supreme object is for the future can be summed up in one word, security. that means not only physical security which provides safety from attacks by aggressors, and it's also economic security and social security. the individual political right upon which the united states had been built, was not argued, were necessary, but not sufficient to carry t. true freedom and security. fdr announced an economic liberates, which is sometimes called the second bill of rights. it included the right to a job and a living wage, direct housing, education and security in old age and their right to adequate medical care in the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health. so we cannot fdr mishearing florence greenberg speech, we here at kos and his second bill of rights. the idea of economic and social rights is an essential supplement to political right started as far back as the french revolution. the idea of a righ
bring what polk wants, which is peace in the securing of california and texas into the union. mexico refuses to surrender, despite the victories. so polk decides to invade central mexico. and he bombards veracruz and travel throughcentral mexico, securing the capital in the fall of 1847. in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a poor pollution that their side would win. and win easily. most u.s. citizens harbored racist beliefs about mexican man. foremost being that they were cowardly to fight. in fact, mexican troops fought hard come, as you can see in this rare print. you can actually get a sense of what their rendition wasn't what was happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the board because they had interior weapons and their leadership was terrible. mexico's government was internal. they were broke. there were various battles where there were no money. the army was supporting itself. because hostile american tribes in new mexico had so rabidly acted, there was little development in the northern mexico. now, on the mexican side, most
union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
democratic legitimacy within the european union. when we are discussing banking union, it's at this house that we should account, when we're discussing the union budget it is this house the represent our taxpayers that we should account. and i always bear that in mind when i'm negotiating as it will be tomorrow at the european council. >> can the prime minister confirm the autumn statement reveals the government is now borrowing 212 billion pounds more than it previously planned? >> well, i wouldn't take this from the honorable lady if her plans were to borrow even more. the point is, i know that the party opposite was desperately disappointed that the office for budget responsibility predicted that borrowing would come down this year as well as last year. but that is the fact. >> the prime minister has rightly said that we are locked in a global economic raise. does he share my concern that having the highest aviation taxes in the world makes it harder for businesses to compete, and increases the cost of living? will he ask the treasure to conduct a thorough review of whether this tax co
. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940» and the british and the french did what the germans expected, asz soon as the germans went io belgium, the french and the british went in. the armored divisions came in behind, and force really the cream
with the confederate army. on the union's side, not a blood relative but a man who had a formative influence on her life joined the union army and was involved with some notable battles. on the first lady's father's side, there is an ancestor. sometimes making these connections is difficult. someone who i think is an ancestor who joined the union army around the time slavery was ended. kind of making that link was unclear but not an easy thing. the records are there in terms of the civil war service of those ancestors and the descendants didn't know about that. >> you talk a lot about dna testing. with a book like this and your research have been possible before dna testing? >> good question. it certainly helped. we would have had circumstantial evidence that would have suggested the first lady's white ancestors came from the shield's family that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i jus
union meant that the future of communism is decided, i think, however long it takes, it will collapse in china too. i believe, yet his tragic sense of life would have kept him from being poly anish about western civilization. human societies like human beings live by faith and die when faith dies, he wrote. certainly, in europe he would see that faith dying. similarly, he would have watched faith in that case, in communism, die in the ussr, and we are seeing faith in communism die in china. would he see faith dying slowly now in our own country, while yet it burns so brightly in so much of the muslim world, or would he see the extraordinary expansion in africa, latin america, or evangelicalism in our own country as a sign today of new hope? i leave you that for the discussion period. thank you. [applause] >> i want to begin by quoting stockdale who said who am i, and what am i doing here? the first thing that occurs to me is perhaps i had been invited because i am the owner of a hat that looks remarkably like the one that chambers' models on the cover of the program. [laughter] it's p
the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented a
with you with regard to unions. unions are very important. it was unions that allowed my parents to raise seven children and former sharecroppers with second grade education in one generation to send their kids to college and allow me to be a member of the congress of the united states of america. it was unions. i will fight in july die for the strength of unions because they do play a very significant role. as a representative from maryland by now how critical the northeast corridor is to ensuring mobility from the mid-atlantic to boston. the corridor is also critical to local mobility in many commuter rail lines. every year eleven million passengers, our constituents ride amtrak in the northeast corridor. ridership that as this committee was told last week is only expected to increase with population growth. isn't that wonderful? the creation of the service moved us in the direction of high-speed rail, that service is not as bad as we need. we need high-speed rail service and we needed in the northeast corridor. i remind you that this is the united states of america, the greatest countr
for insured depository institution and the ncua for credit unions provides unlimited insurance for noninterest-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-ye
than just roofless capitalism strong labor unions of course tax rates of the top and then a second era of financial capitalism, deregulation and capitalism and there's a widespread belief to talk to people. it explores the growth and the higher efficiency that must make everybody better off and it's not true. growth was slower in the second half and because the big instance stopped being spread to the general population or went to a handful of people at the top. the archetype is that they are actually setting it too low. it's not the 1 percent, it is the .1% for people that needed and in the earlier period, paul was absolutely right in the earlier period the quintile, every group in the population was growing but the bottom part was growing faster than the top. today it is not that way. gdp doesn't really give you a good measure of what is happening through the economy and the society. so, while that one-tenth of 1 percent has been doing very well, the median income is lower than it was a decade and a half ago. it is as low as it was two decades ago to go to the top. so, it's clear tha
conversation, and franklin came out close to tears and at that point elliott said, let's just go to union station, which is one of the only three people in town that would serve people of color in 1948. for he mat crystallizes why i enjoy studying law clerks. it's personalities, not only the justices and the clerk, clerks who have gone on to fame and fortune of their own. warren christopher, secretary of state, clerked for bill douglass. five law clerks who returned to the supreme court. i enjoy the stories as they shed light on these relationships. the stories shed light on the relationship between judicial attitudes and personalities and judicial behavior, and also because the supreme court clerkship is about, number one, when it comes to internships in this done there, and in 1998, when i was in graduate school, thinking about a clerk, i read a series of articles written by tony mauro about the law clerks -- the supreme court justices' law clerks hiring practice, and when the justices were not hiring very many women and were not hiring people of color. and those issues also important b
of its people. the soviet union began to relax its restrictions on jewish emigration in 1987 during gorbachev's perestroika. then following the collapse of the soviet union in 1991, millions of soviet jews were permitted to leave. since then, russia has allowed free emigration. i have felt for a long time that we should have graduated russia from jackson-vanik when jackson-vanik's noble purpose was achieved rather than waiting years, often in the effort to make other points relative to russia on other issues. first some history. in 2007, i met with rabbi lazar, chief rabbi of russia regarding jackson-vanik. he urged passage of legislation ending the application of jackson-vanik to russia. also in 2007, i received a letter from the chairman of the federation of jewish communities which represents presidents and rabbis of over 200 jewish communities in russia, a letter which urged me to work to graduate russia from the jackson-vanik amendment in view of the fact that its goals had already been met. part of his letter reads as follows -- quote -- "we're thankful for all your efforts to
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